Research Design Service: East Midlands
National Institute for Health Research

Latest News

Impact evaluation (Advanced): Understanding options, choices and practice

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Impact

This is a Social Research Association course on Impact evaluation (cost: £270 full day event). See website for course dates

The course will cover:

  • ● The nature of advanced evaluation, how it relates to programme theories and its practical use?
  • ● An introduction to different types of ‘advanced’ evaluation – and the principal of proportionality in design.
  • ● The governments Magenta-Combined and other practical guidance – and it usefulness for meeting evaluation needs of publicly-funded programmes or initiatives.
  • ● The cost-effective use, and combination, of sophisticated evaluation designs - what methods are best suited to what needs and in what circumstances.
  • ● Experimental, quasi experimental, and non-experimental methods in understanding attribution and ‘new’ alternative ways of looking at qualitatively assessing causality.
  • ● Stakeholder and beneficiary engagement; being aware of and addressing ethical issues in selecting participants.

Tips and guidelines on questionnaire design all in one place

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Guidance

Questionnaire Design Resource Centre is a library of tips and guidelines on questionnaire design. It's been created to help researchers better understand the challenges of collecting survey data, improve knowledge in health and market survey questionnaire and clinical outcome assessment measure design.

 


New interactive costing tool for industry

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Costing | Industry

The NIHR has launched a new web-based costing tool for industry - which will enable faster and more efficient costing and contracting between the life sciences sector and the NHS during the study set-up phase. The online iCT will complement the existing Excel-based Industry Costing Template and both will continue to be available through the NIHR CRN Study Support Service Early Contact and Engagement service.


Priorities for local NHS research and innovation in different regional areas in England published

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Priorities

The National Survey of Local Innovation and Research Needs of the NHS was commissioned by NHS England and NHS Improvement (NHSE/I), NIHR and the Academic Health Science Network (AHSN). The report presents findings from a survey of local health stakeholders, including clinical leaders, managers and directors, within each of the England’s 15 AHSN regions, to identify the local NHS innovation and research needs. The project aims to help the AHSNs, research funders and research practitioners ensure their work will address the specific local NHS challenges and address the health and care needs of the local population.


12 actions to support and apply research in the NHS

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in News Items

12 point action plan to ensure the NHS keeps and improves it's position as being one of the most attractive places in the world to
undertake research in the life sciences.

Simplify NHS research processes:

  • Manage excess treatment costs better.
  • Eliminate delays in confirming multi-site trials.

Articulate the NHS’s own research priorities better:

  •  Set out research priorities for national NHS programmes.
  •  Increase research focus and capability on value and cost.
  • Set out local NHS research and innovation priorities of Academic Health Science Networks and Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships.

Enhance our data infrastructure:

  • Increase GP practice participation in the Clinical Practice Research Datalink.
  • Back 3-5 local NHS systems as they create interoperable local care records that are also research-ready.

Support advanced research into leading edge technologies:

  • Develop the NHS genomic medicine service.
  • Develop the application of artificial intelligence in pathology and radiology at scale.

Improve and simplify our adoption ecosystem:

  • Use NHS England’s specialised commissioning and commercial medicines clout, combined with NICE appraisals, to drive faster uptake of affordable, high impact innovation.
  • Back AHSNs to become the main local NHS delivery vehicle for spreading innovations.
  • Review and simplify the number of different national innovation projects and programmes.

£25 million funding awarded to leading disease prevention projects

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Funding

A partnership of twelve funders including charities, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) councils and the UK health and social care departments have established the UK Prevention Research Partnership aiming to develop, test and refine new, practical and cost-effective approaches to preventing non-communicable diseases.

The £25 million has been earmarked for eight projects tackling the bigger picture factors behind the prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) - illnesses that can’t be passed from person to person - such as heart disease, obesity, poor mental health, cancer and diabetes. NCDs make up the vast majority of illnesses in the UK, accounting for an estimated 89 per cent of all deaths. These projects aim to deliver real changes that reduce the burden of these diseases on our health and social care systems and enable people to live longer, healthier lives. 

The list of current award recipiants and the next call for proposals will be launched in autumn 2019.


New NIHR Patient Engagement in Clinical Development Service begins roll out

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in Public Involvement

A new NIHR initiative is bringing patients and life science companies together earlier in the clinical development process. The aim of the Patient Engagement in Clinical Development Service is to facilitate patient involvement before a study's protocols are finalised to help make commercial clinical research more patient-friendly, and achieve better recruitment and retention in the long term.


Financial incentives for patients

  Created on Tuesday, 14 May 2019. Posted in News Items

It is often not clear how best to help people make healthy changes. In the case of tobacco or alcohol consumption, there is good evidence that financial disincentives, such as increasing sales taxes, do deter these harmful behaviours. But these approaches are not suitable in many situations. There is increasing interest in the use of financial incentives, such as small cash rewards, to promote particular desirable behaviours.

Evidence to date about the effectiveness of financial incentives is mixed. The NIHR has funded a range of studies exploring the use of incentives in different circumstances, and how people feel about them. This Highlight explores this evidence and considers how incentives can be helpful in healthcare, for who and in what circumstances.


Assessing the impact of healthcare research: A systematic review of methodological frameworks

  Created on Thursday, 09 May 2019. Posted in Impact

Increasingly, researchers need to demonstrate the impact of their research to their sponsors, funders, and fellow academics. However, the most appropriate way of measuring the impact of healthcare research is subject to debate. This review provides a collective summary of existing methodological frameworks for research impact, which funders may use to inform the measurement of research impact and researchers may use to inform study design decisions aimed at maximising the short-, medium-, and long-term impact of their research.


Economic analysis of service and delivery interventions in health care

  Created on Thursday, 11 Apr 2019. Posted in Literature | Health Economics

In 2016, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Journals Library published a series of essays, in which a range of UK and international experts in health services research identified current developments and future challenges in methods to evaluate health, social care and public health innovations. It was recognised that this volume did not comprehensively address the full array of methods. One such gap was the economic evaluation of service innovations.

There are well-developed guidelines for economic evaluation of clearly defined clinical interventions, but no such guidelines for economic analysis of service interventions. Distinctive challenges for analysis of service interventions include diffuse effects, wider system impacts, and variability in implementation, costs and effects. Cost-effectiveness evidence is as important for service interventions as for clinical interventions. There is also an important role for wider forms of economic analysis to increase our general understanding of context, processes and behaviours in the care system. Methods exist to estimate the cost-effectiveness of service interventions before and after introduction, to measure patient and professional preferences, to reflect the value of resources used by service interventions, and to capture wider system effects, but these are not widely applied. Future priorities for economic analysis should be to produce cost-effectiveness evidence and to increase our understanding of how service interventions affect, and are affected by, the care system.

THis curent report looks at:

  • Scope and role for economic analysis
  • Distinctive issues in the economic analysis of service interventions
  • Challenges for economic analysis of service interventions
  • Recent developments
  • Future challenges and priorities